Difference between revisions of "Ad-Hoc Networks"

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'''Abstract''': Wireless ad hoc networks (also referred to as packet radio networks and multi-hop radio networks) consist of mobile nodes communicating over a shared wireless channel. Contrary to cellular networks, where the nodes are restricted to communicate with a set of carefully placed base stations, in wireless ad hoc networks there are no base stations; any two nodes are allowed to communicate directly if they are close enough, and nodes must use multi-hop routing to deliver their packets to distant destinations. The lack of wired infrastructure, the nature of the wireless channel, and the mobility of the nodes create many challenging problems in the link, network, and higher layers of the OSI hierarchy. On the other hand, the lack of wired infrastructure and their topology make these networks ideal for many applications, from personal area networks, to search and rescue operations, to massive networks of millions of sensors. It is therefore expected that, once all the technological issues are solved, wireless ad hoc networks will become an integral part of our society's communication network infrastructure.
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* [[Network Simulator ns2]]
 
* [[Network Simulator ns2]]
 
* [[Wireless Networks]] - especially IEEE 802.11
 
* [[Wireless Networks]] - especially IEEE 802.11
 
* [[DARPA Packet Radio Network|DARPA Packet Radio Network]] - the early beginnings
 
* [[DARPA Packet Radio Network|DARPA Packet Radio Network]] - the early beginnings
 
* [[RoutingPrinciples|Routing Principles]] - Distance Vector, Link State
 
* [[RoutingPrinciples|Routing Principles]] - Distance Vector, Link State
* [[RoutingProtocols| Routing Protocols]] for wireless ad-hoc networks (e.g. DSDV, AODV, ZRP)
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* [[RoutingProtocols| Routing Protocols]] for wireless multi-hop networks (e.g. DSDV, AODV, ZRP)
 
* [[Multi-Path Routing]]
 
* [[Multi-Path Routing]]
* [[Broadcast in Wireless Networks]]
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* [[Routing Protocol Performance]]
* [[Multicast in Wireless Networks]]
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* [[Broadcast in Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
* [[Opportunistic Forwarding]]
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* [[Multicast in Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
* [[Directed Diffusion|Advanced Forwarding: Directed Diffusion]]
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* Advanced Forwarding: [[Opportunistic Forwarding]], and [[Directed Diffusion]]
 
* [[WirelessNetworksCapacity| Capacity of Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
 
* [[WirelessNetworksCapacity| Capacity of Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
* [[OpportunisticForwarding| Opportunistic Forwarding]]
 
 
* [[TCP Performance in Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
 
* [[TCP Performance in Wireless multi-hop Networks]]
 
* [[Energy-Aware Protocols]]
 
* [[Energy-Aware Protocols]]

Revision as of 17:53, 18 October 2004

Abstract: Wireless ad hoc networks (also referred to as packet radio networks and multi-hop radio networks) consist of mobile nodes communicating over a shared wireless channel. Contrary to cellular networks, where the nodes are restricted to communicate with a set of carefully placed base stations, in wireless ad hoc networks there are no base stations; any two nodes are allowed to communicate directly if they are close enough, and nodes must use multi-hop routing to deliver their packets to distant destinations. The lack of wired infrastructure, the nature of the wireless channel, and the mobility of the nodes create many challenging problems in the link, network, and higher layers of the OSI hierarchy. On the other hand, the lack of wired infrastructure and their topology make these networks ideal for many applications, from personal area networks, to search and rescue operations, to massive networks of millions of sensors. It is therefore expected that, once all the technological issues are solved, wireless ad hoc networks will become an integral part of our society's communication network infrastructure.